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ROSA invites graphic designers to the CHEOPS design competition

on 21 November 2017

The Romanian Space Agency (ROSA) invites Romanian graphic designers and artists to enter the CHEOPS competition organised by the European Space Agency (ESA). Participants have the unique opportunity to feature their work on the rocket carrying the CHEOPS satellite. The deadline for submissions is 31 January 2018 and the winner will be notified by the end of February 2018.

Students of graphic art or design, or early career graphic artists and designers have the chance to make one of their designs a part of ESA history. The design will be placed on the Soyuz rocket's fairing, the tough outer shell that protects the satellite. It will be visible during launch preparations and liftoff, as well as on photographs and video footage taken at the spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana.

The winner will be invited to attend the main CHEOPS launch event in Europe as a guest of ESA and to watch as their design climbs skywards. The mission will be ready for launch by the end of 2018.

Participants are invited to express their creativity as they like as long as the design is inspired by the themes of the CHEOPS mission, which will observe planets in orbit around nearby stars. In order to be eligible, participants should submit their original work, and that they have full legal right to use any portion that is not their original work. Submissions found to be inappropriate on religious, racial, gender, political or other grounds will be declared ineligible, without appeal or recourse, and will not be published.

The shortlist selection will be made by a jury, composed of representatives from the CHEOPS project, the CHEOPS consortium and the ESA communication team. The final decision will be taken by the management of the CHEOPS project.

Read more about CHEOPS on the dedicated ESA webpages and on the mission webpages from the University of Bern.

The full competition rules are available here.

Image credit: ESA